Bruxism

What is Bruxism?
Bruxism (teeth grinding), which is described as the disease of this age, is repetitive jaw muscle activity characterized by the clenching or grinding of the teeth or severely bracing of the jaw. The teeth are in contact with each other for an average of 17 minutes a day in daily life, but this can increase to 2–2.5 hours with Bruxism.

What are the Causes of Bruxism?

  • Psychological stress is the leading cause, and it is considered to be a reflection of a stressful daily life that emerges during sleep.
  • It is common in individuals with thyroid conditions and those under pressure.
  • It occurs in people working in jobs that require physical performance.
  • It can also occur during restorations or treatments that prevent jaw movement.
  • Bruxism is common among children, but tends to disappear with age.

What are the Symptoms of Bruxism?

  • Tooth wear and sensitivity, gingival bleeding
  • Pain and spasm in the chewing muscles
  • A tired feeling in the face
  • Morning pain in the temporalis (in the temple)
  • Frequent broken teeth or dental restorations

How is Bruxism Treated?
Bruxism treatments are focused on the etiology/cause. If the cause is psychological, psychological therapy is administered; and if there is an orthodontic disorder, then orthodontic treatment is administered.

In acute cases, night guards, infrared therapy and muscle relaxants are recommended.

People with this complaint are usually unaware that they are grinding/clenching their teeth, and are informed by those around them about their grinding/clenching of their teeth during sleep. People with Bruxism experience complaints such as jaw pain, tired feelings in the face, and teeth sensitivity when they wake up in the morning.

Psychological stress is the leading cause, and it is considered to be a reflection of a stressful daily life that emerges during sleep. It is common among children, but tends to disappear with age.